Initiated through a grant from Thomson Reuters, these large-scale experiments aim to explore new critical modes of data visualization.

We Can
A data driven multimedia project that reveals the way canners - people who pick up cans and bottles on the street - experience the city
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Who are the canners? How do they experience the city? How much can they make, 5 cents at a time?

Over the past eight months, journalist Francesca Berardi followed a group of canners in their daily activity, collecting qualitative and quantitative information about their work. They come in the form of handwritten notes, sketches, audio interviews, photos and videos taken with an iPhone, which was the only technological tool used on the field. We are now working together to build a multimedia interactive digital platform that challenges the preconceived notion of canners as desperate, homeless, junkies while inviting the users to explore NYC through their eyes.

Through audio vignettes, drawings, mapping and data visualizations, we are telling the stories of a Mexican couple who make more than $50,000 a year collecting garbage, of a young queer who picks up cans and bottles to help his grandma and performs on Broadways shows, of a man who lost his apartment in the 2008 mortgage crisis and that says that canning saved him from depression. 

The funding for this project has been provided through a Magic Grant from the Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation.

View the project here.

Project Team
Name Project Role
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Project
Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households: An Exploratory Analysis in New York City
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Francisco Saldarriaga, David A. King
Publication date: 
Friday, January 27, 2017
Publication name, page number: 
Journal of Public Transportation
Description (optional): 
Taxicabs are critical complements to public transit systems. In New York City, ubiquitous yellow cabs are as iconic as the city’s subway system, and the city recently added green taxicabs to improve taxi service in areas outside of the Central Business Districts and airports. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use. At the very least, existing and new providers of transit services must consider access to mainstream financial products as part of their equity analyses.
Intro text (homepage): 
In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
King, Saldarriaga
Publication short title (carousel): 
Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Friday, January 27, 2017
(currently rendering default node template)
 
Just Published: Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households

"Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households: An Exploratory Analysis in New York City," by David King and CSR Research Scholar, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga has been published in the Journal of Public Transportation. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services

Abstract: Taxicabs are critical complements to public transit systems. In New York City, ubiquitous yellow cabs are as iconic as the city’s subway system, and the city recently added green taxicabs to improve taxi service in areas outside of the Central Business Districts and airports. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use. At the very least, existing and new providers of transit services must consider access to mainstream financial products as part of their equity analyses.

Download the full article here

 

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CSR Researcher Juan Francisco Saldarriaga to Speak at Bloomberg – Data for Good Exchange
Sep 15, 2016 — Spatial Information Design Lab

Juan Francisco Saldarriaga will be presenting his recent paper ‘Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households’ during the Data for Good Exchange yearly conference at Bloomberg. The conference will take place on September 25th, 2016. Here’s a description of the presentation: Taxicabs are a critical aspect of the public transit system in New York City. Ubiquitous yellow cabs are as iconic as the city’s subway system, and the city recently added green taxicabs to improve taxi service in areas outside of the central business districts and airports. In this paper we use multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we find that both immigrant status and being ‘unbanked’ are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards. At the very least, existing and new providers of transit services must consider access to mainstream financial products as part of their equity analyses.

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Exit
An immersive installation that investigates global human migrations, updated to coincide with Cop21 in December 2015.
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Global populations are unstable and on the move. Unprecedented numbers of migrants are leaving their countries for economic, political and environmental reasons. Exit, immerses the viewer in a dynamic presentation of data documenting contemporary human movement. Statistics documenting population shifts are not always neutral and the multiple efforts to collect them are decentralized and incomplete. Here the data are repurposed to build a narrative about global migration and its causes. The viewer enters a circular room and is surrounded by a panoramic video projection of a globe which rolls around the room printing maps as it spins. The maps are made from data which has been collected from a variety of sources, geocoded, statistically analyzed, re-processed through multiple programming languages and translated visually. The presentation is divided into narratives concerning population shifts, remittances, political refugees, natural disaster and sea-level rise and endangered languages.

Originally completed in 2008, EXIT has been fully updated to coincide with Cop21, the United Nations Conference on Climate Change and reflects data from 2015. On view at the Palais Tokyo in Paris from November 25, 2015 – January 10, 2016.

Population and urban migration. Photo © Luc Boegly

Project Team
Name Project Role
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Columbia Data Science Society Lecture - Next Level Data Visualization

Juan Francisco Saldarriaga will be presenting multiple center projects emphasizing process and code for the Data Science Society at Columbia University. He will describe in detail how to gather data from public APIs and how to use different visualization tools to produce compelling graphics.

Read more.

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Project
Port to Port
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Saldarriaga, Laura Kurgan, Dare Brawley, Jen Lowe
Publication date: 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Publication name, page number: 
Spatial Information Design Lab
Description (optional): 
Ninety percent of all goods worldwide are moved by ship, but shipping is mostly invisible. More than 300 million Metric Tons of energy are shipped in and out of the United States each year, in 60,000 shipments. This project presents the ports and paths of the 2.7 billion Metric Tons of energy shipped through more than 90 US ports from 2002 - 2012. Using data assembled by Thomson Reuters, Port to Port maps global oil shipping routes as well as other forms of energy navigating ocean territories to and from the United States. Using D3 as an interactive web platform we designed a map interface that is scaled globally while embedded with local stories about energy movement from port to port. Data can be viewed across time, which reveal changes in patterns of movement as the geopolitics, price of oil, and conditions at specific ports change.
Intro text (homepage): 
Ninety percent of all goods worldwide are moved by ship, but shipping is mostly invisible. More than 300 million Metric Tons of energy are shipped in and out of the United States each year, in 60,000 shipments. This project presents the ports and paths of the 2.7 billion Metric Tons of energy shipped through more than 90 US ports from 2002 - 2012. Using data assembled by Thomson Reuters, Port to Port maps global oil shipping routes as well as other forms of energy navigating ocean territories to and from the United States. Using D3 as an interactive web platform we designed a map interface that is scaled globally while embedded with local stories about energy movement from port to port. Data can be viewed across time, which reveal changes in patterns of movement as the geopolitics, price of oil, and conditions at specific ports change.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Project Lead: Juan Francisco Saldarriaga
Publication short title (carousel): 
Port to Port
Is Website?: 
yes
dashboard_sort_date: 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Project
Jumping the Great Firewall
person role
Author(s): 
Dan Taeyoung
Publication date: 
Tuesday, April 8, 2014
Publication name, page number: 
Spatial Information Design Lab
Description (optional): 
This project visualizes a relatively new phenomenon: online free expression in China. It examines some innovative strategies employed by users of Weibo, a Twitter–like micro–blogging platform, in order to avoid government censorship bloggers post images as text. Images are much more difficult for automated search programs to analyze, which allows image-based content to spread more widely before it is detected and removed. Taking advantage of this, some users now turning writing into images, taking screenshots of their own and others' controversial posts before they're removed, then posting and re–posting them. The project visualizes Weibo posts that were posted and deleted between September 8th to November 13th, in 2013.
Intro text (homepage): 
This project visualizes a relatively new phenomenon: online free expression in China. It examines some innovative strategies employed by users of Weibo, a Twitter–like micro–blogging platform, in order to avoid government censorship bloggers post images as text. Images are much more difficult for automated search programs to analyze, which allows image-based content to spread more widely before it is detected and removed. Taking advantage of this, some users now turning writing into images, taking screenshots of their own and others' controversial posts before they're removed, then posting and re–posting them. The project visualizes Weibo posts that were posted and deleted between September 8th to November 13th, in 2013.
Lead image: 
Author C4SR: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Project Lead: Dan Taeyoung
Publication short title (carousel): 
Jumping the Great Firewall
Is Website?: 
yes
dashboard_sort_date: 
Tuesday, April 8, 2014
(currently rendering default node template)
 
The Art of Data Visualization: Activity Mapping Workshop

Juan Francisco Saldarriaga will be leading a workshop on how to download API data using Python in the context of the Art of Data Visualization conference to be held at Columbia University on April 7th. The workshop will take place at the Digital Social Science Center (215 Lehman Library) from 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM.

Here’s a description of the workshop: This workshop will introduce you to basic Python programing and to social media APIs. Students will learn how to write basic Python code to import data, query API's and extract information, and export the results in formats that can be used for analysis or mapping.

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The Art of Data Visualization: Activity Mapping Lecture

Juan Francisco Saldarriaga presented two recent center projects in his talk ‘Activity Mapping’ during the Art of Data Visualization conference held at Columbia University on April 6th. The talk took place at the Davis Auditorium (room 412 Schapiro CEPSR) at 10:50 AM.

Here's a video of the talk:

Here’s a description of the talk: Foursquare check-ins? Citibike rides? Open data can tell us a lot about our cities and how we use them: what we think of them, how we feel about them and how we live in them. In this talk we present two research projects that use this data to explore and understand how people live in New York. We analyze check-in data from Foursquare and Facebook to examine how social media activity relates to socio-economic factors and what this kind of data can tell us about how people feel about the modern city. We also analyze Citibike ride data visualizing the imbalance problems the system faces. All of this, while also exploring multiple ways of representing spatial data.

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