Visualising Data - Best of the visualisation web… June 2014

Citi Bike Rebalancing Study featured on Visualising Data's "Best of the Visualization Web...June 2014" list. 

Visit the link below to find out more:

http://visualisingdata.com/index.php/2014/08/best-of-the-visualisation-web-june-2014/

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"Maps Reveal Widespread Imbalances in Citi Bike Stations" - Curbed

Curbed contributor Rowley Amato writes about our CitiBike Rebalancing Study:

"It's been a rough couple of months for Citi Bike, what with the revelation that the program requires "tens of millions" to stay afloat, or news that annual membership rates could skyrocket from $95 to $150/year. Still, that's not stopping Columbia University fromattempting to perfect the imperfect system.

Using weekday data from October 2013, researcher Juan Francisco Saldarriaga at Columbia's Spatial Information Design Lab mapped demand imbalances at every Citi Bike station in the city.

Some of the findings are expected, with the worst imbalances occurring from 6 to 10am and 4 to 8pm. Peak data in the morning shows most bikes leaving residential neighborhoods (the Lower East Side, the East Village, Chelsea, and Hell's Kitchen), and arriving at Midtown East and the Financial District. The opposite is true in the afternoon and evening."

Read more.

 

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By Plotting Journeys, Providing a Glimpse at Citi Bike Ridership
Mar 31, 2014 — Matt Flegenheimer, City Room

The New York Times, City Room contributor Matt Flegenheimer on Juan Francisco Saldarriaga's research on CitiBike trips: 

"Since its introduction last May, the Citi Bike program has attracted 100,000 annual members but far fewer daily subscribers than expected, a combination that has contributed to the system’s precarious finances as operators look to expand.

The math is simple: Regular riders strain the system through repeated use, leading to higher costs. A new data visualization project demonstrates this phenomenon, and makes clear the degree to which the bike share system has become interwoven into the city’s transit network."

Read more.

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Million Dollar Blocks in Design and Violence Exhibition at MoMA
Oct 23, 2013 — Steven Pinker, MoMA

Million Dollar Blocks on view in MoMA's Design and Violence exhibition. Thanks to Steven Pinker for this article about the project:

"Information graphics have been given a bad name by USA Today. Many people think of them as ways of tarting up the trend of the day into a bit of eye candy. Nothing could be further from the truth. Our ability to understand cause and effect in the world depends on grasping complicated relationships among variables—how people, money, actions, power, things, and qualities are distributed in space, how they vary in time, and how they affect one another. The human brain did not evolve to do such complex calculations. But we are primates, with almost a third of our brain devoted to vision and visual cognition. Translating complicated relationships into a visual format is the best way we have of co-opting our primate neural circuitry to meet the demands of understanding our world. And it is a challenge where the creativity of artists, graphic designers, and other visual thinkers is essential. We have made do with standard graphical formats—pie charts, line graphs, organizational charts, and so on—for more than a century. We need ways to figure out how to use the resources of the page or screen—shape, contour, color, shading, motion, texture, depth­—not just to channel data into brains, but to reveal subtle relationships as visual patterns."

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Criminal Justice Dept.: Rap Map
Jan 08, 2007 — The New Yorker, Lauren Macintyre

"From water pipes to porn shops, cartographers have charted almost every aspect of local urban life, giving rise to a sort of cottage industry: the New York City specialty map. The latest—and one you are not likely to see unless you run in criminal-justice circles—is a rendering of the city that breaks down, block by block, the home addresses of all New Yorkers incarcerated in a given year. This map won’t get you from Century 21 to the Met. But it does reveal that more prison-bound Bronx residents lived in walkups than in any other type of building, that Staten Island is the most law-abiding borough, and that Brooklyn—nicknamed “the borough of churches”—ran up the state’s highest bill in prison costs.

Eric Cadora and Charles Swartz, co-founders of the Brooklyn-based Justice Mapping Center, collaborated on the project with an architect named Laura Kurgan, at Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab. “What started out as a scholarly inquiry has turned into a national initiative,” said Cadora, whose team has mapped twelve cities so far. Their New York is a digital crazy quilt of “bright-against-black”: the areas least touched by incarceration in 2003, the year they chose to study (Riverdale, Bay Ridge, the West Village), appear black and gray; those more so (Coney Island, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Hell’s Kitchen) neon orange."

Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2007/01/08/criminal-justice-dept-rap-map

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"Here Now! How Foursquare and Facebook Measure Voting With Your Feet in New York"
Nov 30, 2011 — Alley Lyles

Untapped Cities writes about Here Now project:

"The Spatial Information Lab at Columbia University has a new project which measures how people vote with their feet by using Foursquare and Facebook check-ins. The exhibit, entitled Here: Now Social Media and the Psychological City, is currently on display at Columbia University’s  Avery Hall.  Sarah Williams, the co-director of the lab, and her team analyzed two weeks of check-in data pulled from Foursquare and Facebook API to explore how people communicate their thoughts and preferences on locations in New York City. What’s unique about this analysis is that it links psychological information about the city with hard statistical and spatial analysis. Using urban planning tools such as GIS, the exhibit  re-purposes and visualizes where people are at a given place in time and what they are saying about it."

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"We Are Here Now / Spatial Information Design Lab / Columbia University" - ArchDaily
Mar 30, 2012 — Karen Cilento

ArchDaily's Karen Cilento writes about "Here Now":

"Addicted to checking your favorite site, like ArchDaily, for constant updates, or checking in with Facebook or Foursquare? Don’t worry – you’re not alone, and Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab can prove it.  In addition to sharing your whereabouts with friends, your geographic mark provides valuable insight in examining the psycho-geography and economic terrain of the city."

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"We Are Here Now" - Flowing City
Apr 06, 2012 — Flowing City

Flowing City writes about SIDL project Here Now: Social Media And The Psychological City

"Social media are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, from connecting with friends and sharing images to exploring cities through location-based applications. These new services have given us a different vantage point from which to understand, explore, navigate, and geographically record the places we live.

Sites such as Foursquare and Facebook allow us to spatially mark our explorations in the city, creating rich databases that hold digital imprints of our interactions. To analyze these traces, the Foursquare and Facebook Application Programming Interfaces (API’s) were used to access location-based data to determine where social media users broadcast that they are “Here Now”. Analysis of this geographic data exposed the psycho-geography and economic terrain of New York City’s social media users."

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"The Dot Matrix: Some maps show us where to go. But the ones created at Columbia's Spatial Information Design Lab may show us where we're headed." - Columbia Magazine
Aug 01, 2012 — David J. Craig

SIDL's work and research ethos was featured with an article in Columbia Magazine: "More data, more maps, more stories. More voices participating in a conversation about how to view our cities, address their problems, and serve their residents. That’s the goal of Kurgan and her colleagues at SIDL, who, for the past eight years, have been training civic organizations, nonprofit groups, and ordinary citizens to tell their own stories through thematic cartography"

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"Columbia's Spatial Information Design Lab Helps Map the Future" - Smart Planet
Aug 04, 2012 — Smart Planet, Reena Jana

Smart Planet's Reena Jana write about Here Now: Social Media And The Psychological City:

""Big Data" and "social media" are today's biggest buzzwords. But beyond their trendiness as topics, Big Data and social media also allow everyday people to share their voices and stories, to participate in ways to possibly improve their lives. Someone, however, needs to make sense of all of the information floating around--by organizing neatly and efficiently to help communities analyze patterns, discover problems, and act to find solutions.

This is one of the roles of the Spatial Information Design Lab (SIDL) at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), which translates data into beautiful and compelling maps to communicate statistical information."

Read more: http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/decoding-design/columbias-spatial-information-design-lab-helps-map-the-future/

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