TUTORIAL
 
Project
Visualizing the Victims of the Colombian Conflict
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Francisco Saldarriaga
Publication date: 
Friday, March 10, 2017
Publication name, page number: 
Yuca
Description (optional): 
This article published by Yuca magazine describes the Conflict Urbanism: Colombia project. In it, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga describes how, having grown up in Colombia, working on this project has changed his understanding of the conflict. The article describes the maps, graphs, color pixels, and thickening lines that have shown the size and magnitude of the worst massacres, revealed the moments and events that caused stakeholders to change positions, and made evident the constant and painful journeys of the displaced and other victims.
Initiative: 
Intro text (homepage): 
This article published by Yuca magazine describes the Conflict Urbanism: Colombia project. In it, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga describes how, having grown up in Colombia, working on this project has changed his understanding of the conflict. The article describes the maps, graphs, color pixels, and thickening lines that have shown the size and magnitude of the worst massacres, revealed the moments and events that caused stakeholders to change positions, and made evident the constant and painful journeys of the displaced and other victims.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Saldarriaga
Publication short title (carousel): 
Visualizing the Victims of the Colombian Conflict
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Friday, March 10, 2017
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Project
Conflict Urbanism, Aleppo: Mapping Urban Damage
person role
Author(s): 
Laura Kurgan
Publication date: 
Sunday, January 1, 2017
Publication name, page number: 
AD / Architectural Design
Description (optional): 
One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities on the planet, Aleppo now lies in tatters. This devastation of a designated World Heritage Site is a poignant example of the human and cultural cost of armed conflict – in this case the Syrian Civil War. The Center for Spatial Research has analyzed satellite imagery and reports from the ground to assess the damage in Aleppo. In this article, Laura Kurgan discusses the initiative and its sometimes puzzling findings.
Initiative: 
Intro text (homepage): 
In this article for Architectural Design, Laura Kurgan discusses the Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo project and its sometimes puzzling findings. One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities on the planet, Aleppo now lies in tatters. This devastation of a designated World Heritage Site is a poignant example of the human and cultural cost of armed conflict – in this case the Syrian Civil War. The Center for Spatial Research has analyzed satellite imagery and reports from the ground to assess the damage in Aleppo.
Lead image: 
Author C4SR: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Kurgan
Publication short title (carousel): 
Conflict Urbanism, Aleppo: Mapping Urban Damage
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Sunday, January 1, 2017
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Project
Visualizing Conflict: Possibilities for Urban Research
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Francisco Saldarriaga, Laura Kurgan, Dare Brawley
Publication date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
Publication name, page number: 
Urban Planning
Description (optional): 
The Center for Spatial Research (CSR) is undertaking a multiyear project investigating what we have termed Conflict Urbanism. The term designates not simply the conflicts that take place in cities, but also conflict as a structuring principle of cities intrinsically, as a way of inhabiting and creating urban space. The increasing urbanization of warfare are examples of the term but conflict is not limited to war and violence. Cities are not only destroyed but also built through conflict. They have long been arenas of friction, difference, and dissidence, and their irreducibly conflictual character manifests itself in everything from neighborhood borders, to differences of opinion and status, to ordinary encounters on the street. This article discusses two projects currently under way at CSR that use mapping and data visualization to explore and analyze Conflict Urbanism in two different contexts: the city of Aleppo, and the nation of Colombia.
Initiative: 
Intro text (homepage): 
This article, published by the open access journal Urban Planning, outlines recent work as part of the multiyear Conflict Urbanism project. This article discusses two projects currently under way that use mapping and data visualization to explore and analyze Conflict Urbanism in two different contexts: the city of Aleppo, and the nation of Colombia. Both projects interrogate the world of ‘big data,’ as a means to open up new areas of research and inquiry, but with a particular focus on data literacy as an essential part of communicating with these new forms of urban information.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Saldarriaga, Kurgan, Brawley
Publication short title (carousel): 
Visualizing Conflict: Possibilities for Urban Research
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
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ProPublica Article Features Million Dollar Blocks

The Million Dollar Blocks project was featured in a recent article about countering bias in data driven journalism published by ProPublica. Author, Lena Groeger, describes the myriad ways that journalistic projects are (often unwittingly) biased from their outset as a result of design decisions made by their authors. Groeger highlights the Million Dollar Blocks project’s approach to investigating the criminal justice system, namely investigating the geographies of incarceration rather than the geographies of crime, as a counter example to standard narratives about the justice system.  

Read the full article here

 

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Project
Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households: An Exploratory Analysis in New York City
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Francisco Saldarriaga, David A. King
Publication date: 
Friday, January 27, 2017
Publication name, page number: 
Journal of Public Transportation
Description (optional): 
Taxicabs are critical complements to public transit systems. In New York City, ubiquitous yellow cabs are as iconic as the city’s subway system, and the city recently added green taxicabs to improve taxi service in areas outside of the Central Business Districts and airports. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use. At the very least, existing and new providers of transit services must consider access to mainstream financial products as part of their equity analyses.
Intro text (homepage): 
In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
King, Saldarriaga
Publication short title (carousel): 
Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Friday, January 27, 2017
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Just Published: Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households

"Access to Taxicabs for Unbanked Households: An Exploratory Analysis in New York City," by David King and CSR Research Scholar, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga has been published in the Journal of Public Transportation. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services

Abstract: Taxicabs are critical complements to public transit systems. In New York City, ubiquitous yellow cabs are as iconic as the city’s subway system, and the city recently added green taxicabs to improve taxi service in areas outside of the Central Business Districts and airports. In this paper, we used multiple datasets to explore taxicab fare payments by neighborhood and examine how paid taxicab fares are associated with use of conventional banking services. There are clear spatial dimensions of the propensity of riders to pay cash, and we found that both immigrant status and being “unbanked” are strong predictors of cash transactions. These results have implications for local regulations of the for-hire vehicle industry, particularly in the context of the rapid growth of services that require credit cards to use. At the very least, existing and new providers of transit services must consider access to mainstream financial products as part of their equity analyses.

Download the full article here

 

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Mapping Workshops During NYCDH Week

Michelle McSweeney and Dare Brawley will offer two introductory GIS workshops as part of this year’s New York City Digital Humanities Week. NYCDH Week offers students, faculty, librarians, and researchers the opportunity to take advantage of workshops in the digital humanities offered at universities across the city. Check out the full schedule of NYCDH Week workshops here. All workshops are free and open to the public.

This year the Center for Spatial Research will offer two workshops, both hosted at Studio@Butler:

Introduction to Mapping with QGIS
February 7 from 3 – 5pm
Studio@Butler
Please register here.

Making Maps into Webmaps with Leaflet.js
February 8 from 1 – 3pm
Studio@Butler
Please register here.

We hope you can join us!

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