TUTORIAL
 
Open Positions for Summer 2016

We’re Hiring.

The Center for Spatial Research is seeking Graduate Research Assistants for summer 2016 for both full-time and part-time positions.

Students will be responsible for research, data analysis, visualization, and exhibition design on projects dealing with current research focus: conflict urbanism. Students will work with spatial data including mining and analyzing data, processing and collecting data, and/or visualizing data in compelling and innovative ways. Working in close collaboration with principal investigators students will develop these projects, participate in writing research papers and create visualizations of relevant data analysis for inclusion in papers, multi-media projects, and upcoming exhibitions in international biennales.

Candidates must have experience with GIS and Adobe Creative Suite. In addition, a working knowledge of a range of the following tools is a plus: Processing, Python, D3, R, APIs Access, Stata/SPSS, HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

Full-time positions are 35 hours per week for up to twelve weeks. Part-time work will be negotiable by student and by project. All positions are $15/hour.

Please send a letter of interest, CV, and relevant work examples to info@c4sr.columbia.edu

 

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"The Human Face of Big Data" features Million Dollar Blocks
Feb 24, 2016 — Spatial Information Design Lab

Laura Kurgan was interviewed about the Million Dollar Blocks project for the PBS documentary "The Human Face of Big Data." The documentary aired nationally on February 24, 2016 and featured Laura Kurgan speaking about the Center for Spatial Research's unique approach to mapping and data visualization: "And there is always that moment in data vizualization where you are looking at tons and tons of data. The point is not to look at the tons and tons of data but to look at what are the stories that emerge out of it."

The Human Face of Big Data explores the impace of our current data-filled age: "With the rapid emergence of digital devices, an unstoppable, invisible force is changing human lives in incredible ways. Every two days the human race is now generating as much data as was generated from the dawn of humanity through the year 2003. The massive gathering and analyzing of data in real time is allowing us to address some of humanity's biggest challenges but as Edward Snowden and the release of NSA documents have shown, the accessibility of all this data comes at a steep price. This film captures the promise and peril of this extraordinary knowledge revolution."

Watch the documenary here. 

 

 

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Chicago's Million Dollar Blocks
Jun 25, 2015 — Spatial Information Design Lab

A new project led by Dr. Daniel Cooper of Adler University and Dr. Ryan Lugalia-Hollon, a writer and strategist, drews on our work on Million Dollar Blocks to map the incarceration landscape in Chicago. They used data collected by the Chicago Justice Project and built on research methods developed by the Spatial Information Design Lab. Through their research they've found that between 2005 and 2009 there are 851 blocks in Chicago with over $1 million committed to prision sentences.

See their full project here. 

 

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"How Mass Incarceration Creates ‘Million Dollar Blocks’ in Poor Neighborhoods" - Washington Post
Jul 30, 2015 — Spatial Information Design Lab

Emily Badger of the Washington Post reported the Million Dollar Blocks project "There are neighborhoods on the West Side of Chicago where nearly every block has been painted red — a sign, on the above map, that someone there was sentenced to time in an Illinois state prison between 2005 and 2009 for a nonviolent drug offense.

On several dark-red blocks [mapped here in Chicago], the missing residents are so many — or their sentences so long — that taxpayers have effectively committed more than a million dollars to incarcerate people who once lived there.

This is the perverse form that public investment takes in many poor, minority neighborhoods: "million dollar blocks," to use a bleak term first coined in New York by Laura Kurgan at Columbia University and Eric Cadora of the Justice Mapping Center. Our penchant for incarcerating people has grown so strong that, in many cities, taxpayers frequently spend more than a million dollars locking away residents of a single city block."

Read more.

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Columbia Data Science Society Lecture - Next Level Data Visualization

Juan Francisco Saldarriaga will be presenting multiple center projects emphasizing process and code for the Data Science Society at Columbia University. He will describe in detail how to gather data from public APIs and how to use different visualization tools to produce compelling graphics.

Read more.

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TUTORIAL
TUTORIAL
TUTORIAL
 
Project
Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections
person role
Author(s): 
Kurgan, Cadora, Cummings,
Publication date: 
Saturday, April 12, 2008
Publication name, page number: 
Justice Mapping Center
Description (optional): 
The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision.
Intro text (homepage): 
The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision.
Lead image: 
Author C4SR: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Project Lead: Laura Kurgan
Publication short title (carousel): 
Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Saturday, April 12, 2008
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