Project
Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections
person role
Author(s): 
Kurgan, Cadora, Cummings,
Publication date: 
Saturday, April 12, 2008
Publication name, page number: 
Justice Mapping Center
Description (optional): 
The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision.
Intro text (homepage): 
The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision.
Lead image: 
Author C4SR: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Project Lead: Laura Kurgan
Publication short title (carousel): 
Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections
Is Website?: 
no
dashboard_sort_date: 
Saturday, April 12, 2008
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Project
Port to Port
person role
Author(s): 
Juan Saldarriaga, Laura Kurgan, Dare Brawley, Jen Lowe
Publication date: 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Publication name, page number: 
Spatial Information Design Lab
Description (optional): 
Ninety percent of all goods worldwide are moved by ship, but shipping is mostly invisible. More than 300 million Metric Tons of energy are shipped in and out of the United States each year, in 60,000 shipments. This project presents the ports and paths of the 2.7 billion Metric Tons of energy shipped through more than 90 US ports from 2002 - 2012. Using data assembled by Thomson Reuters, Port to Port maps global oil shipping routes as well as other forms of energy navigating ocean territories to and from the United States. Using D3 as an interactive web platform we designed a map interface that is scaled globally while embedded with local stories about energy movement from port to port. Data can be viewed across time, which reveal changes in patterns of movement as the geopolitics, price of oil, and conditions at specific ports change.
Intro text (homepage): 
Ninety percent of all goods worldwide are moved by ship, but shipping is mostly invisible. More than 300 million Metric Tons of energy are shipped in and out of the United States each year, in 60,000 shipments. This project presents the ports and paths of the 2.7 billion Metric Tons of energy shipped through more than 90 US ports from 2002 - 2012. Using data assembled by Thomson Reuters, Port to Port maps global oil shipping routes as well as other forms of energy navigating ocean territories to and from the United States. Using D3 as an interactive web platform we designed a map interface that is scaled globally while embedded with local stories about energy movement from port to port. Data can be viewed across time, which reveal changes in patterns of movement as the geopolitics, price of oil, and conditions at specific ports change.
Lead image: 
Author Last Names for table: 
Project Lead: Juan Francisco Saldarriaga
Publication short title (carousel): 
Port to Port
Is Website?: 
yes
dashboard_sort_date: 
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo
An evolving and interdisciplinary study of urban damage in Aleppo, Syria.
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Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo is the first in a series of interrelated projects as part of our multi-year year research initiative on Conflict Urbanism.

In January 2016 we launched the Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo interactive map, amidst intense violence in Aleppo more than five years after the start of the civil war in Syria. The map served as a research tool for the spring 2016 Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo seminar and as a new window into the conflict for the world at large. The map combines layers of high-resolution satellite images together with data gathered by human rights organizations and the UN to show the historic city from 2012 to the present. Using the logic of a typical geographic information system (GIS) map, the Conflict Urbanism: Aleppo project overlaps these layers, accruing two kinds of evidence: evidence about the physical destruction of the city and evidence about how urban warfare is tracked and monitored from a distance.

We are continuing to release additional case studies that shed light on the effects of the conflict on the urban fabric of Aleppo. We have combined several experimental methods in order to look at the conflict and the urban context of Aleppo in new ways: by cross referencing YouTube videos we have geocoded with bi-weekly change maps we created using low resolution and free Landsat satellite imagery we have been able to identify intense areas of damage on high resolution satellite images that have gone undocumented by the international human rights community, which uses other methods to look at these same high resolution satellite images. 

The project has been exhibited at the 2016 Istanbul Design Biennale (October 22- November 20, 2016) and has been the subject of several invited lectures and articles including in the Harvard Graduate School of Design Magazine, Architecture Design, and at the Unknown Unknowables conference in Copenhagen, and a Curating Data conference at Harvard. 

Project Team
Name Project Role
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Conflict Urbanism Aleppo
The first in a series of Mellon Foundation supported seminars on Conflict Urbanism.
   
About

This is the first in a series of multidisciplinary Mellon seminars on the topic of Conflict Urbanism, as part of a multi-university initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities. This year, we will focus on Aleppo in Syria. Conflict Urbanism is a term that designates that cities are not only destroyed but also built through conflict.

This spring, the seminar focus will be on the city of Aleppo and the places now inhabited by refugees from the city. We will begin with an art historical, and historical survey of one of the most continuously inhabited cities in the world dating back to 10 000 BC. We will examine the urban artifacts of colonialization, the diverse religious and cultural monuments, and the trade routes that have formed the city as it existed until 2011. Then we will look beyond the recent dramatic eruption of state violence and civil war to its antecedents and contexts in rural-urban migration, largely driven by other factors, including poverty and drought. We will examine the time-based destruction of Aleppo at macro and micro levels, analyzing conflict patterns in its social and urban structure. We will then expand what we call "Aleppo" to include the tens of thousands of former residents now sheltered in other cities and in refugee camps in Turkey and Jordan. In order to re-imagine the city in it’s post-conflict state our work will be informed by an analysis of the problems encountered in the rebuilding of cities as diverse as Beirut, Kabul, and Sarajevo, which are in various states of rebuilding post-conflict and offer a range of results that need interrogation.

Methods

Our work will be by necessity multidisciplinary and include the history, architecture, politics, media, culture, literature and contemporary manifestations of particular cities as they relate to the topic of Conflict Urbanism. Our work will also be multi-media. To study cities today, we have an abundance of data and databases accessible to focus our research. Students will have access to a platform developed by the Center for Spatial Research for their work. It provides students a user friendly framework for navigating, analyzing, and interpreting a series of maps and imagery, characterizing changes resulting from social conflict or natural disasters during the conflict years in Aleppo. The platform can be used in one of two ways: to facilitate navigating and understanding the conflict from a distance, in order to and write about a topic; or, to add to the platform, in a multi-media format on a specific topic or issue, with regard to a specific neighborhood, monument, institution or network.

Final Projects

The final projects which emerged from the course were diverse in focus and approach. Students worked in groups (often composed of members from multiple schools or departments) and drew on diverse archives about the city including: data about the conflict, reporting on social media, official and ‘unofficial’ planning documents in the lead up to the war, records of cultural and religious artifacts in order to produce rich multimedia projects. 

The results of the student work have been collected and published online here

Course Files
NYRP - The Haven Project
Analysis of New York City neighborhoods according to specific health, demographic and environmental metrics.
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New York Restoration Project (NYRP) is developing a master plan to renovate a network of open spaces in Mott Haven and Port Morris in the South Bronx. Over the next several years, NYRP will fund the renovations and build them. The project aims to demonstrate measurable health and social outcomes resulting from an improved physical environment at the neighborhood scale. For example, one hypothesis is that by improving access to Randall’s Island, residents’ physical activity will increase with a correlative decrease in health care costs. As a first step, we will capture baseline health data and quality of life indicators which we will track as the project progresses.

This project includes maps and charts that analyze and compare different parts of New York City according to specific health, demographic and environmental metrics. 

We used three types of measurements:

  • Environmental, which include tree and grass coverage, pollution levels (PM 2.5) and walking distance to recreational spaces measuring 6 acres or more.
  • Health, including asthma rates, self-reported exercise in the previous 30 days, and overweight percentages.
  • Demographics, which include percentage of the population living below the poverty line, percentage of the population younger than 18 and 65 or older, and percentage of the population having attained only high-school or less.

Pollution levels (P.M. 2.5)

Percentage of grass and tree coverage

Walking distance to large open spaces

Percentage of people who have had asthma

Percentage of the population with only high-school level education or less

Project Team
Name Project Role
{{person.name}} {{person.role}}
Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections
An online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the U.S. criminal justice system.
  • Browse by Initiative
   
 

The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision. 

The Justice Atlas of Sentencing and Corrections is an online tool for mapping the residential distribution of people involved in the criminal justice system. It uses aggregated address data to map the flow of people being removed to prison, reentering communities from prison, and the standing population concentrations of people under parole or probation supervision.

Thematic Maps
Thematic maps reveal the spatial patterns and disproportionate distribution of people under criminal justice custody or supervision at the state, county, municipal, zip code, and census tract levels.

Analytical Data Tables
For each map a series of supporting tables is available which provide additional data variables, such as number of men and number of women under parole supervision.

Supporting Census Charts
And for further context, the Justice Atlas also provides charts of U.S. Census Bureau data about local conditions, such as median household income or percent single parent households.

The Justice Atlas is designed to be updated each year and expanded to include more states, more data, and more analytical themes.

Justice Mapping Center

Project Team
Name Project Role
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Related Publications
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Superstorm Sandy
A platform for viewing data about the Sandy affected region in the weeks following the storm.
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Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey on October 29th. Data generated by governments and volunteers in the weeks following the storm stand to provide critical insight into how the region was affected. These pages make such data visible, and serve as launching pad for further investigations and questions of the impact of the storm.

Project Team
Name Project Role
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