Posted on November 27, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

With the Dean of Humanities we are pleased to invite interested Columbia University faculty and doctoral candidates to participate in Mapping for the Urban Humanities: A Summer Institute.

Mapping for the Urban Humanities is a two-week skills-building workshop in critical cartography, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. It is designed to expand the disciplinary locations within which spatial knowledge in the urban humanities is produced and interpreted. Workshop participants will learn key skills in mapping, data collection, and data visualization that they can incorporate into their research and teaching. Space is limited. Interested faculty and doctoral candidates are encouraged to apply by January 26, 2018.

The Summer 2018 session will be held from 1:00-5:30pm, May 21-June 1, 2018 with an optional third week practicum from June 4-8. No class will be held on Memorial Day, May 28. 

Eligibility: This course is open to faculty, research scholars and doctoral candidates from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and Barnard College. 

If you have questions about your eligibility or about whether your course or research project is a good fit for the institute, please do not hesitate to reach out to Dare Brawley (dare.brawley@columbia.edu) at the Center for Spatial Research. 

How to Apply: Interested faculty and doctoral candidates should apply by sending the following materials to info@c4sr.columbia.edu by January 26, 2018.

  • 1-2 page statement that describes your interest in taking the institute, and includes a description of the course or research topic you hope to workshop during the summer intensive. 
  • CV 

More information about the course, including materials from prior iterations of the institute, is available here.

Posted on November 21, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

The Center for Spatial Research is pleased to announce a call for applications for Associate Research Scholars for the 2018-2019 academic year as part of the Andrew W Mellon Foundation funded initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities.

We invite applications from candidates whose intellectual interests are situated within the broad urban humanities, who have strong digital, visual, and multidisciplinary research practices, and are enthusiastic about collaborative working environments. The appointment is one year, with the possibility of a second year depending on funding.

Two Associate Research Scholars will be appointed: one position is open to candidates with training in the design disciplines, and one is open to candidates with training in a field(s) of the humanities. 

Successful candidates must have experience and interest in using qualitative as well as quantitative data to open up new questions in the urban humanities. The incumbents will contribute to projects underway at CSR, work on independent research on a topic(s) proposed by the incumbent, as well as contribute to the design and teaching of the Center’s workshop and seminar courses.

For further information and to apply for the position for candidates from fields in the humanities please visit: academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=65554

For further information and to apply for the position for candidates from the design fields please visit:  academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=65546

You will be asked to submit a 1-2 page letter of interest, 2 page proposal for the project(s) you would hope to complete at the Center, CV, and portfolio which demonstrates your work and research focus.

Review of applications will begin immediately.

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Posted on November 3, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

The Center for Spatial Research, with Urban Omnibus, has just published an interactive map that locates the diverse sites and institutions that comprise the New York City criminal justice system. The map is part of Urban Omnibus’s new series, The Location of Justice, which examines “the pervasive and often overlooked infrastructure of criminal justice in New York and the spaces that could serve a more just city.”

The map was built and designed by Laura Kurgan, Juan Saldarriaga, and Jochen Hartmann at the Center for Spatial Research based on data that was originally compiled by Emily Schmidt of the Architectural League. Additional research contributions were made by Olivia Schwob, Ayluonne Terieszkiewicz, Maya Tellman, and Nishant Jacob.

For more information and to view the map visit Urban Omnibus here

Posted on November 3, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

Students from Laura Kurgan’s fall 2016 #CLOSErikers Advanced Architecture studio, Clara Dykstra and Stella Ioannidou published their research “After Arrest” as part of Urban Omnibus’s new series, The Location of Justice, which examines “the pervasive and often overlooked infrastructure of criminal justice in New York and the spaces that could serve a more just city.”

Based on consultations with working public defenders, as well as the Center for Court Innovation and Legal Aid, Dykstra and Ioannidou chart a timeline of a hypothetical individual’s first encounters with the criminal justice system for the first 24-36 hours after arrest.

For more information and to view the project visit Urban Omnibus here

Posted on October 19, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

Points Unknown, a new collaboration between the Center for Spatial Research, Brown Institute and Faculty from the Journalism School, launched a five-week course module this week for students at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Points Unknown aims to bridge practices of journalism, data science, urbanism and cartography to develop new reporting practices among Columbia’s journalism students and new modes of design practice for GSAPP students. During the 2017-2018 academic year the collaboration will result in three five-week module courses for Journalism School students as well as a semester-long course for GSAPP students (to be taught in Spring 2018). The Points Unknown curriculum is designed by CSR Researchers Juan Francisco Saldarriaga and Grga Basic, with Marguerite Holloway and Michael Krisch of the Journalism School and the Brown Institute, respectively.

More details about the course as well as resources for mapping in storytelling can be found at pointsunknown.github.io.

Points Unknown is generously funded by the Collaboratory Fellows Fund, a new university-wide program that seeks to promote new cross disciplinary collaborations that support data literacy for students across the University. 

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research
Photo credit: Caitlin Ochs for The New York Times

The New York Times features the mapathon organized by the Columbia's Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities and the Columbia Libraries with the support from CSR Researcher, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga and CSR steering committe member Manan Ahmed. Over sixty students, faculty, and staff gathered on Friday, September 29 to map the hardest hit rural areas of Puerto Rico using OpenStreetMap. 

Read the full article here

 

 

 

 

Posted on October 1, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research
Corinne Segal for PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour features the mapathon organized by the Columbia's Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities and the Columbia Libraries with the assistance from CSR Researcher, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga and CSR steering committee member Manan Ahmed. Over sixty students, faculty, and staff gathered on Friday, September 29 to map the hardest hit rural areas of Puerto Rico using OpenStreetMap. 

Read the full article here

 

 

 

Posted on September 15, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research
Image by Nurri Kim, courtesy of Adam Greenfield.

Adam Greenfield discusses his newest book, Radical Technologies: The Design of Everyday Life, in conversation with Laura Kurgan.

Friday, September 15, 2017 at 1:00pm in Ware Lounge, Avery Hall. 

Everywhere we turn, our everyday experience of the world is being transfigured by the advent of startling new technologies. But at what cost? In this urgent and revelatory excavation of the Information Age, leading technology thinker Adam Greenfield forces us to rethink our relationship with the networked objects, services and spaces that define our lives, as well as the Silicon Valley consensus that is determining the shape of our future.  

We already depend on the smartphone to navigate every aspect of our daily lives. The technologies that follow in its wake, from augmented-reality interfaces and virtual assistants to autonomous delivery drones and self-driving cars, are offered to us with the promise that they will make life easier, more convenient and more productive. 3D printing promises unprecedented control over the form and distribution of matter, while the blockchain stands to revolutionize everything from the recording and exchange of value to the way we organize ourselves in groups and polities. And all the while, fiendishly complex algorithms are operating quietly in the background, reshaping the economy, transforming the fundamental terms of our politics and even redefining what it means to be human.

Having successfully colonized everyday life, these radical technologies are now conditioning the choices that will be available to us in the future, and most of us haven’t even begun to think about what it all means. Just how did they claim such a prominent place in our lives? How do they work? What challenges do they present to us, as selves and societies? In answering these questions, Greenfield orients us to the circumstances we now confront — and prods us to the thought and action necessary to ensure that our values will survive the years to come.

 

Posted on September 1, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

The Center for Spatial Research is seeking student assistants for the Fall 2017 semester.

Students will be responsible for data analysis, visualization, map design, and will support research on projects dealing with our current research focus: conflict urbanism. Students will work extensively with spatial data including mining and analyzing data, processing and collecting data, and/or visualizing data in compelling and innovative ways. Working in close collaboration with principal investigators, students will produce work for inclusion in papers, multi-media projects, and exhibitions.

Candidates must have experience with GIS and Adobe Creative Suite. In addition, please let us know if you have experience with any of the following tools: Processing, Python, D3, R, APIs, Microsoft Access, SQL, Stata/SPSS, HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

We are seeking candidates who have experience with computational tools but are also eager to acquire additional skills through the course of their work with us. CSR researchers will mentor successful candidates and match them with projects which help them build additional fluencies with computational methods.

Positions are 10-20 hours per week. Hours are negotiated on a per-student basis. All positions are $15/hour. Please note positions are only available for continuing GSAPP students.

Please send a letter of interest, CV, and relevant work examples to info@c4sr.columbia.edu. For further information please visit c4sr.columbia.edu

Applications due September 15, 2017, materials will be reviewed in the order there are received. 

Posted on August 16, 2017 by Center for Spatial Research

The Center for Spatial Research will be offering a workshop series in fall 2017 designed to give a basic introduction to core concepts and methods for work with geographic information systems in the urban humanities. The hands-on workshop series aims to contribute to existing campus-wide GIS resources, and is thus tailored to students doing coursework and research in the urban humanities with no prior GIS experience. It is open to students from all schools at Columbia University.

Interested participants must register for one session of each workshop. The registration period closed on September 22nd.

Participants must bring their own laptop to each session – workshops will use QGIS a free and open source software that runs on both Mac and Windows operating systems. 

Thinking in Space: an Introduction to QGIS (3 hours)

Session A: September 26, 5-8pm; Session B – September 29, 1-4pm

This workshop will introduce participants to core concepts of geographic information systems (GIS) through the open source GIS software QGIS. Participants will learn how to create maps of existing spatial datasets, formulate and answer spatial questions, and design compelling maps.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Add layers to a map project
  • Comprehend the components of a shapefile
  • Design a compelling map composition
  • Perform basic queries on a GIS dataset, using both tabular and spatial queries 
  • Perform a table join to add additional data to an existing shapefile’s attribute table

Data in Space: Creating Spatial Data from Historical or Analog Sources (3 hours)

Session A – October 10, 5-8pm; Session B – October 13, 1-4pm

This workshop will introduce participants to methods for creating data for historical GIS applications. The workshop will cover how to give geographic coordinates (georeference) scanned historical maps using QGIS, as well as how to digitize (trace) features from this scanned map to create new shapefiles. These are two key ways of creating spatial data from historical or other sources. Additional online tools for georeferencing scanned maps will also be introduced.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Gain fluency in geo-referencing scanned paper maps
  • Understand how to create new datasets by digitizing features from a scanned paper map
  • Understand principals behind how to encode qualitative or quantitative data in spreadsheets to work with in a GIS