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The Center for Spatial Research was established in 2015 as a hub for urban research that links design, architecture, urbanism, the humanities and data science. It sponsors research and curricular activities built around new technologies of mapping, data visualization, data collection, and data analysis. CSR focuses on data literacy as well as interrogating the world of 'big data,' working to open up new areas of research and inquiry with advanced design tools to help scholars, students as well as our collaborators and audiences, to understand cities worldwide – past present and future.

Our projects generally involve collaborations with researchers and advocates across a variety of disciplines and institutions, working with them to communicate information clearly, critically, responsibly, and provocatively. We are committed to rigorous and reliable work with data; to harnessing the most powerful techniques of design and visualization; and to a critical reflection on the limits and ideologies of both data and its representation. Based in the disciplines of design, architecture and urbanism we make links with and bring spatial expertise to humanities as well as the sciences.
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The Center for Spatial Research was established in 2015 as a hub for urban research that links design, architecture, urbanism, the humanities and data science. It sponsors research and curricular activities built around new technologies of mapping, data visualization, data collection, and data analysis. More

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The Center for Spatial Research (CSR) was established in 2015 through a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. CSR supersedes and builds on the work of the Spatial Information Design Lab (SIDL) founded at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation in 2004. To view a complete archive of SIDL’s work you can visit our old website here.
 
[{"nid":"423","access":true,"node":{"vid":"423","uid":"39","title":"Mapping Historical New York City","log":"","status":"1","comment":"1","promote":"0","sticky":"0","nid":"423","type":"project","language":"und","created":"1544134160","changed":"1545355131","tnid":"0","translate":"0","revision_timestamp":"1545355131","revision_uid":"39","field_description":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping Historical New York, through web-based, interactive maps, reconstructs the demographic and structural shifts of Manhattan and Brooklyn between 1850 and 1920. During this period, the city grew and diversified through the arrival of large groups of immigrants. Furthermore, the city boundaries expanded in the late 1890s to include a major section of Long Island specifically Brooklyn and Queens.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThrough a three year collaboration between the Center for Spatial Research and the Department of History, Historical New York City uses historical GIS and spatial history to develop new understanding of the magnitude of the changes that took place across this time.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThe project team is digitizing maps of Manhattan and Brooklyn and integrating individual-level records from historical US Censuses to build a comprehensive web-based resource for researchers and students interested in New York City\u2019s history. In addition to producing maps and analysis for the city as a whole, the project plans to develop detailed case studies designed to deepen engagement with the digitized historical maps and demographic datasets at the neighborhood level. The resulting maps, tools, and information will be accessible to the public.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EIn addition to the public-facing, interactive webmap, the project aims to train faculty and students in digital research and teaching methods. Courses on historical New York, immigration, urban history, and spatial history, offered in conjunction with project responsibilities, promote faculty and student involvement in the project\u2019s design, development, and production.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EFunding for this project is provided by the Robert D. L. Gardiner Foundation.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping Historical New York, through web-based, interactive maps, reconstructs the demographic and structural shifts of Manhattan and Brooklyn between 1850 and 1920. During this period, the city grew and diversified through the arrival of large groups of immigrants. Furthermore, the city boundaries expanded in the late 1890s to include a major section of Long Island specifically Brooklyn and Queens.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThrough a three year collaboration between the Center for Spatial Research and the Department of History, Historical New York City uses historical GIS and spatial history to develop new understanding of the magnitude of the changes that took place across this time.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThe project team is digitizing maps of Manhattan and Brooklyn and integrating individual-level records from historical US Censuses to build a comprehensive web-based resource for researchers and students interested in New York City\u2019s history. In addition to producing maps and analysis for the city as a whole, the project plans to develop detailed case studies designed to deepen engagement with the digitized historical maps and demographic datasets at the neighborhood level. The resulting maps, tools, and information will be accessible to the public.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EIn addition to the public-facing, interactive webmap, the project aims to train faculty and students in digital research and teaching methods. Courses on historical New York, immigration, urban history, and spatial history, offered in conjunction with project responsibilities, promote faculty and student involvement in the project\u2019s design, development, and production.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EFunding for this project is provided by the Robert D. L. Gardiner Foundation.\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_category":{"und":[{"tid":"2"}]},"field_project_tags":[],"field_project_images2":{"und":[{"fid":"908","uid":"39","filename":"hnyc_perris2.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/hnyc_perris2.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"137074","status":"1","timestamp":"1544134160","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":600,"width":900},"height":"600","width":"900","alt":"A few blocks on the Lower East Side as documented in William Perris\u2019 1852 Maps of the City of New York. (Source: New York Public Library)","title":""},{"fid":"909","uid":"39","filename":"hnyc_1880census2.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/hnyc_1880census2.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"202537","status":"1","timestamp":"1544134160","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":600,"width":900},"height":"600","width":"900","alt":"The project will visualize individual records from the 1880 US Census. (Source: Ancestry.com)","title":""}]},"field_software_tags":[],"field_additional_people":[],"field_project_files":[],"field_project_contact":{"und":[{"email":"info@c4sr.columbia.edu"}]},"field_project_videos":[],"field_more_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_2":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_more_videos":[],"field_additional_project_text":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping Historical New York will create web-based, interactive maps of Manhattan and Brooklyn as well as detailed neighborhood case studies to show demographic and structural shifts in the city from 1850 to 1920.\u0026nbsp;\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping Historical New York will create web-based, interactive maps of Manhattan and Brooklyn as well as detailed neighborhood case studies to show demographic and structural shifts in the city from 1850 to 1920.\u00a0\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_date":{"und":[{"value":"2018-01-01 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_lead_image":{"und":[{"fid":"907","uid":"39","filename":"hnyc_perris1.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/hnyc_perris1.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"139044","status":"1","timestamp":"1544134160","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":500,"width":980},"height":"500","width":"980","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_intro_text":[],"field_publication_links":[],"field_black_dots_in_slideshow_na":{"und":[{"value":"0"}]},"field_initiative":{"und":[{"tid":"112"}]},"field_themes":{"und":[{"tid":"95"},{"tid":"111"},{"tid":"93"},{"tid":"88"}]},"field_methods":{"und":[{"tid":"105"},{"tid":"103"},{"tid":"101"}]},"field_one_sentence_description":{"und":[{"value":"A collaboration to map immigration and neighborhood change in New York City during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.","format":null,"safe_value":"A collaboration to map immigration and neighborhood change in New York City during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries."}]},"field_project_team_v2":{"und":[{"value":"164","revision_id":"164"},{"value":"176","revision_id":"176"},{"value":"177","revision_id":"177"},{"value":"165","revision_id":"165"},{"value":"166","revision_id":"166"},{"value":"167","revision_id":"167"}]},"field_inline_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_related_projects":[],"field_related_publications":[],"field_project_website_link":[],"field_dashboard_sort_date":{"und":[{"value":"2018-09-12 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_project_gifs":[],"path":"projects\/mapping-historical-new-york-city","name":"dare","picture":"0","data":"a:5:{s:16:\u0022ckeditor_default\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:20:\u0022ckeditor_show_toggle\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:14:\u0022ckeditor_width\u0022;s:4:\u0022100%\u0022;s:13:\u0022ckeditor_lang\u0022;s:2:\u0022en\u0022;s:18:\u0022ckeditor_auto_lang\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;}","initiative":"Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities","sort_date":"2018","pub_link":"","pub_pdf":"","email":"","image_large":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/c4sr_large_inline_slideshow_980x500\/public\/hnyc_perris1.jpg?itok=A5f3qUfG","image_small":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/homepage-400x300\/public\/hnyc_perris1.jpg?itok=EtNVach2","image_square":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/square-crop-for-button\/public\/hnyc_perris1.jpg?itok=31crUoYN"},"node_path_alias":"projects\/mapping-historical-new-york-city"},{"nid":"476","access":true,"node":{"vid":"476","uid":"39","title":"Homophily: the Urban History of an Algorithm","log":"","status":"1","comment":"0","promote":"0","sticky":"0","nid":"476","type":"project","language":"und","created":"1574879774","changed":"1603400311","tnid":"0","translate":"0","revision_timestamp":"1603400311","revision_uid":"39","field_description":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EThe word \u0022homophily\u0022 was coined by researchers Paul Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton in an influential 1954 study of friendships in Addison Terrace, a biracial housing project in Pittsburgh. They were suspicious of the \u0022familiar and egregiously misleading question: do birds of a feather flock together?\u0022 They suggested that friendships form and persist not simply on the basis of shared identities but thanks to shared values and beliefs. They focused on \u0022racial attitudes,\u0022 and discovered that people with what they called \u0022liberal\u0022 values about race were much more likely to be friends with each other, as were people with \u0022illiberal\u0022 positions. In a quirk of statistical reasoning, they used only the survey results from white residents: the black population was so overwhelmingly \u0022liberal\u0022 that comparison was impossible. The model of homophily \u2013 \u0022the tendency for friendships to form between people \u0027of the same kind\u0027\u0022\u0026nbsp; \u2013 was born in this conflictual urban battleground around segregation and integration.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThe afterlife of the concept and its formalization has been remarkable. Today it functions as the principle underlying much of what happens in online social and economic interactions, the axiom that \u2018similarity breeds connection.\u0027 What began as a description of social life has become an algorithmic rule shaping it: homophily drives targeted advertising, recommendations for purchases and viewing, the promotion of certain types of content on social media platforms over others, and the predictions about crime that guide pre-emptive policing. More or less invisibly, it guides us to people, commodities, destinations, and ideas, among other things, and is widely blamed for creating a social world in which previously-held identities and positions are reinforced and concentrated rather than challenged or hybridized.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThe exhibition puts the formalization of homophily in tension with its conceptual and historical origins. The exterior of the five-walled space is covered in custom LED panels that simulate homophily and the segregation that it produces. Inside, a series of probes into the archives of Lazarsfeld and Merton uncover the history of the concept of homophily and its influence on urbanism and network science. Their archive is not simply something from the past. It speaks directly to our present, our segregated cities and our polarized platforms, where the effects of research in a housing project now reverberate at much greater scale in networks and networked cities.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EOn view at the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org\/\u0022\u003E2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial\u003C\/a\u003E September 18,2019 \u2013 January 5, 2020.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EA companion essay to the exhibition is \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/www.e-flux.com\/architecture\/are-friends-electric\/289193\/homophily-the-urban-history-of-an-algorithm\/\u0022\u003Epublished\u003C\/a\u003E in e-flux Architecture.\u0026nbsp;\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EResearch for this exhibition was supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Canada 150 Research Chairs Program, and the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. With thanks Leslie Gill Architect for design consultation, and to the Columbia Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Harriet Zuckerman, Robert Lazarsfeld for assistance and reproduction permissions on archival materials.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003E\u003Cimg alt=\u0022\u0022 class=\u0022image-project-page-image img-responsive project-image-inline\u0022 src=\u0022https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/project-page-image\/public\/CSR_2019_homophily_axo_view_alt-01.png?itok=gRIhLZvY\u0022 \/\u003EIn collaboration with:\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EWendy Hui Kyong Chun, Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media and Professor of Communication, Simon Fraser University\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EGraduate Research Assistants: Alanna Browdy, Rebecca Cook, Audrey Dandenault, Tola Oniyangi, Andrea Partenio, Juvaria Shahid\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EGraphic Design: Studio TheGreenEyl\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EThe word \u0022homophily\u0022 was coined by researchers Paul Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton in an influential 1954 study of friendships in Addison Terrace, a biracial housing project in Pittsburgh. They were suspicious of the \u0022familiar and egregiously misleading question: do birds of a feather flock together?\u0022 They suggested that friendships form and persist not simply on the basis of shared identities but thanks to shared values and beliefs. They focused on \u0022racial attitudes,\u0022 and discovered that people with what they called \u0022liberal\u0022 values about race were much more likely to be friends with each other, as were people with \u0022illiberal\u0022 positions. In a quirk of statistical reasoning, they used only the survey results from white residents: the black population was so overwhelmingly \u0022liberal\u0022 that comparison was impossible. The model of homophily \u2013 \u0022the tendency for friendships to form between people \u0027of the same kind\u0027\u0022\u00a0 \u2013 was born in this conflictual urban battleground around segregation and integration.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThe afterlife of the concept and its formalization has been remarkable. Today it functions as the principle underlying much of what happens in online social and economic interactions, the axiom that \u2018similarity breeds connection.\u0027 What began as a description of social life has become an algorithmic rule shaping it: homophily drives targeted advertising, recommendations for purchases and viewing, the promotion of certain types of content on social media platforms over others, and the predictions about crime that guide pre-emptive policing. More or less invisibly, it guides us to people, commodities, destinations, and ideas, among other things, and is widely blamed for creating a social world in which previously-held identities and positions are reinforced and concentrated rather than challenged or hybridized.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThe exhibition puts the formalization of homophily in tension with its conceptual and historical origins. The exterior of the five-walled space is covered in custom LED panels that simulate homophily and the segregation that it produces. Inside, a series of probes into the archives of Lazarsfeld and Merton uncover the history of the concept of homophily and its influence on urbanism and network science. Their archive is not simply something from the past. It speaks directly to our present, our segregated cities and our polarized platforms, where the effects of research in a housing project now reverberate at much greater scale in networks and networked cities.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EOn view at the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org\/\u0022\u003E2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial\u003C\/a\u003E September 18,2019 \u2013 January 5, 2020.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EA companion essay to the exhibition is \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/www.e-flux.com\/architecture\/are-friends-electric\/289193\/homophily-the-urban-history-of-an-algorithm\/\u0022\u003Epublished\u003C\/a\u003E in e-flux Architecture.\u00a0\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EResearch for this exhibition was supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Canada 150 Research Chairs Program, and the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. With thanks Leslie Gill Architect for design consultation, and to the Columbia Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Harriet Zuckerman, Robert Lazarsfeld for assistance and reproduction permissions on archival materials.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003E\u003Cimg alt=\u0022\u0022 class=\u0022image-project-page-image img-responsive project-image-inline\u0022 src=\u0022https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/project-page-image\/public\/CSR_2019_homophily_axo_view_alt-01.png?itok=gRIhLZvY\u0022 \/\u003EIn collaboration with:\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EWendy Hui Kyong Chun, Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media and Professor of Communication, Simon Fraser University\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EGraduate Research Assistants: Alanna Browdy, Rebecca Cook, Audrey Dandenault, Tola Oniyangi, Andrea Partenio, Juvaria Shahid\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EGraphic Design: Studio TheGreenEyl\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_category":{"und":[{"tid":"1"}]},"field_project_tags":[],"field_project_images2":{"und":[{"fid":"1002","uid":"39","filename":"CSR04_Cory DeWald.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/CSR04_Cory DeWald_0.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"4718811","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":1997,"width":3000},"height":"1997","width":"3000","alt":"Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial \/ Cory DeWald, 2019","title":""},{"fid":"1003","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_homophily_concordance.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_homophily_concordance.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1579667","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":1878,"width":3438},"height":"1878","width":"3438","alt":"","title":""},{"fid":"1004","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_homophily_install1.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_homophily_install1.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"8341172","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":3761,"width":5266},"height":"3761","width":"5266","alt":"","title":""},{"fid":"1005","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_homophily_install_abstract.JPG","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_homophily_install_abstract.JPG","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"794654","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2268,"width":3024},"height":"2268","width":"3024","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_software_tags":[],"field_additional_people":[],"field_project_files":[],"field_project_contact":{"und":[{"email":"info@c4sr.columbia.edu"}]},"field_project_videos":[],"field_more_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_2":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_more_videos":[],"field_additional_project_text":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EAn exhibit focusing on the urban origins of the term homophily, its formalization and proliferation through the algorithmic logics of online networks, and the risks we run when it becomes not just a descriptive model but a prescriptive rule for social life. On view at the Chicago Architecture Biennial September 18,2019 \u2013 January 5, 2020.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EAn exhibit focusing on the urban origins of the term homophily, its formalization and proliferation through the algorithmic logics of online networks, and the risks we run when it becomes not just a descriptive model but a prescriptive rule for social life. On view at the Chicago Architecture Biennial September 18,2019 \u2013 January 5, 2020.\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_date":{"und":[{"value":"2019-01-01 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_lead_image":{"und":[{"fid":"1000","uid":"39","filename":"CSR04_Cory DeWald.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/CSR04_Cory DeWald.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"4718811","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":1997,"width":3000},"height":"1997","width":"3000","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_intro_text":[],"field_publication_links":[],"field_black_dots_in_slideshow_na":{"und":[{"value":"0"}]},"field_initiative":{"und":[{"tid":"78"}]},"field_themes":{"und":[{"tid":"94"},{"tid":"81"},{"tid":"87"}]},"field_methods":{"und":[{"tid":"105"},{"tid":"110"},{"tid":"99"}]},"field_one_sentence_description":{"und":[{"value":"An installation for the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial","format":null,"safe_value":"An installation for the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial"}]},"field_project_team_v2":{"und":[{"value":"186","revision_id":"186"},{"value":"187","revision_id":"187"},{"value":"188","revision_id":"188"},{"value":"189","revision_id":"189"}]},"field_inline_images":{"und":[{"fid":"1001","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_homophily_axo_view_alt-01.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_homophily_axo_view_alt-01.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"514568","status":"1","timestamp":"1574879774","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":1250,"width":1875},"height":"1250","width":"1875","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_make_slideshow_":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_related_projects":[],"field_related_publications":[],"field_project_website_link":[],"field_dashboard_sort_date":{"und":[{"value":"2019-09-18 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_project_gifs":[],"path":"projects\/homophily-urban-history-algorithm","name":"dare","picture":"0","data":"a:5:{s:16:\u0022ckeditor_default\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:20:\u0022ckeditor_show_toggle\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:14:\u0022ckeditor_width\u0022;s:4:\u0022100%\u0022;s:13:\u0022ckeditor_lang\u0022;s:2:\u0022en\u0022;s:18:\u0022ckeditor_auto_lang\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;}","initiative":"Conflict Urbanism","sort_date":"2019","pub_link":"","pub_pdf":"","email":"","image_large":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/c4sr_large_inline_slideshow_980x500\/public\/CSR04_Cory%20DeWald.jpg?itok=N7p99lF8","image_small":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/homepage-400x300\/public\/CSR04_Cory%20DeWald.jpg?itok=PldB569J","image_square":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/square-crop-for-button\/public\/CSR04_Cory%20DeWald.jpg?itok=Yos_5iOa"},"node_path_alias":"projects\/homophily-urban-history-algorithm"},{"nid":"470","access":true,"node":{"vid":"470","uid":"39","title":"Personal Census Atlas","log":"","status":"1","comment":"0","promote":"0","sticky":"0","nid":"470","type":"project","language":"und","created":"1574874773","changed":"1603399836","tnid":"0","translate":"0","revision_timestamp":"1603399836","revision_uid":"39","field_description":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EThis project visualizes the U.S. Census through the lens of 1 person\u2019s location data over the course of 3 years. It addresses the potential of self quantification in the personalization of public aggregate data. The dataset included 899 days of usable data, containing just over 21,000 records of time and location, most of which were in the United States. The over 20,000 American locations recorded are not all unique, they fell into 2633 unique census tracts. Of these tracts, over half of the recorded time was spent in just 9 census tracts. These 9 tracts have demographic characteristics in common in contrast to the rest of the country. The maps contained in this project presents these 9 tracts as a hypothetical island and displays the Census information for this combined area in the same style as a traditional census atlas.\u003Cbr \/\u003E\r\nUntil 1970, the Census was conducted by a team of Census takers that visited each home and filled out Census forms by asking questions of the residents. However in 1970 the Census became self-enumerated, and when many Americans set a pen to the Census forms for the first time, some struggled to categorize themselves. For example, one of the questions that the form asked was \u201cRelationship to Head of Household\u201d. Because no option was given for husband of household, married women saw, for the first time, that they were not able to self-identify as the heads of their own households. In the subsequent Census of 1980, this option was changed. Amid all the other changes that usually occurred between one Census and another, the rewording of this category may seem like an insignificant detail.\u0026nbsp; However, this is a good example that talks about the difference between how we are being counted and how we count ourselves.\u003Cbr \/\u003E\r\nWe are being counted all the time. Despite the increasing nuance and sophistication of classification and categorization systems, the formalization of categories is always going to be playing catch up to how we can define ourselves. Is it possible that we can challenge the transactional nature of our current relationship with data by viewing aggregate data through the lens of self knowledge?\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EThis project visualizes the U.S. Census through the lens of 1 person\u2019s location data over the course of 3 years. It addresses the potential of self quantification in the personalization of public aggregate data. The dataset included 899 days of usable data, containing just over 21,000 records of time and location, most of which were in the United States. The over 20,000 American locations recorded are not all unique, they fell into 2633 unique census tracts. Of these tracts, over half of the recorded time was spent in just 9 census tracts. These 9 tracts have demographic characteristics in common in contrast to the rest of the country. The maps contained in this project presents these 9 tracts as a hypothetical island and displays the Census information for this combined area in the same style as a traditional census atlas.\u003Cbr \/\u003E\nUntil 1970, the Census was conducted by a team of Census takers that visited each home and filled out Census forms by asking questions of the residents. However in 1970 the Census became self-enumerated, and when many Americans set a pen to the Census forms for the first time, some struggled to categorize themselves. For example, one of the questions that the form asked was \u201cRelationship to Head of Household\u201d. Because no option was given for husband of household, married women saw, for the first time, that they were not able to self-identify as the heads of their own households. In the subsequent Census of 1980, this option was changed. Amid all the other changes that usually occurred between one Census and another, the rewording of this category may seem like an insignificant detail.\u00a0 However, this is a good example that talks about the difference between how we are being counted and how we count ourselves.\u003Cbr \/\u003E\nWe are being counted all the time. Despite the increasing nuance and sophistication of classification and categorization systems, the formalization of categories is always going to be playing catch up to how we can define ourselves. Is it possible that we can challenge the transactional nature of our current relationship with data by viewing aggregate data through the lens of self knowledge?\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_category":{"und":[{"tid":"3"}]},"field_project_tags":[],"field_project_images2":{"und":[{"fid":"982","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_1.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_1.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1132918","status":"1","timestamp":"1574874773","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":980,"width":1920},"height":"980","width":"1920","alt":"Census data comparisons between personal geography and the U.S. as a whole","title":""},{"fid":"983","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_2.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_2.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"349311","status":"1","timestamp":"1574874773","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":500,"width":980},"height":"500","width":"980","alt":"Census data comparisons between personal geography and the U.S. as a whole","title":""},{"fid":"984","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_3.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_3.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"628916","status":"1","timestamp":"1574874773","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":980,"width":1920},"height":"980","width":"1920","alt":"Census data comparisons between personal geography and the U.S. as a whole","title":""},{"fid":"985","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_4.png","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_carousel_4.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1643677","status":"1","timestamp":"1574874773","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":916,"width":1795},"height":"916","width":"1795","alt":"Census data locator mobile app","title":""}]},"field_software_tags":[],"field_additional_people":[],"field_project_files":[],"field_project_contact":{"und":[{"email":"info@c4sr.columbia.edu"}]},"field_project_videos":[],"field_more_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_2":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_more_videos":[],"field_additional_project_text":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EThis project visualizes the U.S. Census through the lens of 1 person\u2019s location data over the course of 3 years. It addresses the potential of self quantification in the personalization of public aggregate data. We are constantly viewed through data collected from us. However, despite the increasing nuance and sophistication of classification and categorization systems, the formalization of categories is always going to be playing catch up to how we can define ourselves. Is it possible that we can challenge the transactional nature of our current relationship with data by viewing aggregate data through the lens of self knowledge?\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EThis project visualizes the U.S. Census through the lens of 1 person\u2019s location data over the course of 3 years. It addresses the potential of self quantification in the personalization of public aggregate data. We are constantly viewed through data collected from us. However, despite the increasing nuance and sophistication of classification and categorization systems, the formalization of categories is always going to be playing catch up to how we can define ourselves. Is it possible that we can challenge the transactional nature of our current relationship with data by viewing aggregate data through the lens of self knowledge?\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_date":{"und":[{"value":"2019-01-01 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_lead_image":{"und":[{"fid":"986","uid":"39","filename":"CSR_2019_census_atlas_home_1.jpg","uri":"public:\/\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_home_1.jpg","filemime":"image\/jpeg","filesize":"980082","status":"1","timestamp":"1574874773","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":600,"width":900},"height":"600","width":"900","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_intro_text":[],"field_publication_links":[],"field_black_dots_in_slideshow_na":{"und":[{"value":"0"}]},"field_initiative":{"und":[{"tid":"78"}]},"field_themes":{"und":[{"tid":"111"}]},"field_methods":{"und":[{"tid":"105"},{"tid":"101"}]},"field_one_sentence_description":{"und":[{"value":"A visualization of the U.S. Census through the lens of one person\u2019s longitudinal location data.","format":null,"safe_value":"A visualization of the U.S. Census through the lens of one person\u2019s longitudinal location data."}]},"field_project_team_v2":{"und":[{"value":"182","revision_id":"182"}]},"field_inline_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_related_projects":[],"field_related_publications":[],"field_project_website_link":[],"field_dashboard_sort_date":{"und":[{"value":"2019-04-08 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_project_gifs":[],"path":"projects\/personal-census-atlas","name":"dare","picture":"0","data":"a:5:{s:16:\u0022ckeditor_default\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:20:\u0022ckeditor_show_toggle\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:14:\u0022ckeditor_width\u0022;s:4:\u0022100%\u0022;s:13:\u0022ckeditor_lang\u0022;s:2:\u0022en\u0022;s:18:\u0022ckeditor_auto_lang\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;}","initiative":"Conflict Urbanism","sort_date":"2019","pub_link":"","pub_pdf":"","email":"","image_large":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/c4sr_large_inline_slideshow_980x500\/public\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_home_1.jpg?itok=xDe-O7Wg","image_small":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/homepage-400x300\/public\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_home_1.jpg?itok=GRU9sTVe","image_square":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/square-crop-for-button\/public\/CSR_2019_census_atlas_home_1.jpg?itok=rnsCLE2A"},"node_path_alias":"projects\/personal-census-atlas"},{"nid":"510","access":true,"node":{"vid":"510","uid":"39","title":"Mapping the New Politics of Care","log":"","status":"1","comment":"0","promote":"0","sticky":"0","nid":"510","type":"project","language":"und","created":"1603749760","changed":"1603836917","tnid":"0","translate":"0","revision_timestamp":"1603836917","revision_uid":"39","field_description":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003E\u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/newpoliticsofcare.net\u0022\u003EMapping the New Politics of Care\u003C\/a\u003E links the effects of COVID-19 in the United States with a wide range of social, economic, and environmental conditions.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EIt compares four indexes of vulnerability alongside COVID-19 data and presents multiple options for addressing the effects of the pandemic with a Community Health Corps.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThese conditions and vulnerabilities predated the pandemic and created the conditions for the virus to flourish in this country. The map displays the acute inequalities embedded in the social and political landscape of the United States. This pandemic is not simply biological. It is a symptom of an illness in our body politic. As SARS-CoV-2 roars across the country, it is following the fault lines of social vulnerability.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EAs the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/www.nytimes.com\/interactive\/2020\/07\/05\/us\/coronavirus-latinos-african-americans-cdc-data.html\u0022\u003ENew York Times\u003C\/a\u003E reported in July 2020, \u201cBlack and Latino people have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus in a widespread manner that spans the country, throughout hundreds of counties in urban, suburban and rural areas, and across all age groups.\u201dRepairing the wounds of this pandemic means confronting the policy decisions made long ago that have led us to this moment. As we try to combat this disease, we have to think more broadly about rebuilding health from the ground up in the United States.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThe project builds on a series of essays on \u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/bostonreview.net\/politics\/gregg-gonsalves-amy-kapczynski-new-politics-care\u0022\u003Ea new politics of care\u003C\/a\u003E written by our collaborators, Gregg Gonsalves and Amy Kapczynski at the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/law.yale.edu\/ghjp\u0022\u003EYale Global Health Justice Partnership\u003C\/a\u003E (GHJP) of the Yale Law School and Yale School of Public Health. Together CSR and the GHJP are calling for a New Deal for Public Health, which addresses the acute needs of the pandemic response but also makes a larger national commitment to lifting up the health of our communities, protects the public\u2019s health, and confronts the legacy of vulnerabilities that existed before the emergence of SARS-CoV-2.\u0026nbsp; A new Community Health Corps must be integrated into our communities, providing economic support and social services to start to undo the vulnerabilities that plague us. We call this a new politics of care.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003EThe Community Health Corps should be deployed across the United States. This map poses a series of questions and demands a set of options about how these care workers might be distributed to states and to counties within each state. Making these decisions responsibly requires confronting and addressing not just the virus and the disease but also the inequalities and vulnerabilities that underlie and propel this pandemic.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n\r\n\u003Cp\u003E\u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/newpoliticsofcare.net\/\u0022\u003EExplore the project here.\u003C\/a\u003E\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003E\u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/newpoliticsofcare.net\u0022\u003EMapping the New Politics of Care\u003C\/a\u003E links the effects of COVID-19 in the United States with a wide range of social, economic, and environmental conditions.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EIt compares four indexes of vulnerability alongside COVID-19 data and presents multiple options for addressing the effects of the pandemic with a Community Health Corps.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThese conditions and vulnerabilities predated the pandemic and created the conditions for the virus to flourish in this country. The map displays the acute inequalities embedded in the social and political landscape of the United States. This pandemic is not simply biological. It is a symptom of an illness in our body politic. As SARS-CoV-2 roars across the country, it is following the fault lines of social vulnerability.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EAs the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/www.nytimes.com\/interactive\/2020\/07\/05\/us\/coronavirus-latinos-african-americans-cdc-data.html\u0022\u003ENew York Times\u003C\/a\u003E reported in July 2020, \u201cBlack and Latino people have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus in a widespread manner that spans the country, throughout hundreds of counties in urban, suburban and rural areas, and across all age groups.\u201dRepairing the wounds of this pandemic means confronting the policy decisions made long ago that have led us to this moment. As we try to combat this disease, we have to think more broadly about rebuilding health from the ground up in the United States.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThe project builds on a series of essays on \u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/bostonreview.net\/politics\/gregg-gonsalves-amy-kapczynski-new-politics-care\u0022\u003Ea new politics of care\u003C\/a\u003E written by our collaborators, Gregg Gonsalves and Amy Kapczynski at the \u003Ca href=\u0022https:\/\/law.yale.edu\/ghjp\u0022\u003EYale Global Health Justice Partnership\u003C\/a\u003E (GHJP) of the Yale Law School and Yale School of Public Health. Together CSR and the GHJP are calling for a New Deal for Public Health, which addresses the acute needs of the pandemic response but also makes a larger national commitment to lifting up the health of our communities, protects the public\u2019s health, and confronts the legacy of vulnerabilities that existed before the emergence of SARS-CoV-2.\u00a0 A new Community Health Corps must be integrated into our communities, providing economic support and social services to start to undo the vulnerabilities that plague us. We call this a new politics of care.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003EThe Community Health Corps should be deployed across the United States. This map poses a series of questions and demands a set of options about how these care workers might be distributed to states and to counties within each state. Making these decisions responsibly requires confronting and addressing not just the virus and the disease but also the inequalities and vulnerabilities that underlie and propel this pandemic.\u003C\/p\u003E\n\u003Cp\u003E\u003Ca href=\u0022http:\/\/newpoliticsofcare.net\/\u0022\u003EExplore the project here.\u003C\/a\u003E\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_category":{"und":[{"tid":"2"}]},"field_project_tags":[],"field_project_images2":{"und":[{"fid":"1076","uid":"39","filename":"care_web_screenshots-155-04.png","uri":"public:\/\/care_web_screenshots-155-04_0.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1074038","status":"1","timestamp":"1603830357","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2085,"width":4084},"height":"2085","width":"4084","alt":"New COVID-19 cases in the past 14 days by county, percentile ranked within states","title":""},{"fid":"1077","uid":"39","filename":"care_web_screenshots-155-03.png","uri":"public:\/\/care_web_screenshots-155-03_0.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1118174","status":"1","timestamp":"1603830357","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2084,"width":4084},"height":"2084","width":"4084","alt":"Years of Potential Life Lost by county, percentile ranked within states","title":""},{"fid":"1078","uid":"39","filename":"care_web_screenshots-155-01.png","uri":"public:\/\/care_web_screenshots-155-01_0.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"409442","status":"1","timestamp":"1603830357","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2085,"width":4084},"height":"2085","width":"4084","alt":"Allocating community health workers, county by county based on COVID-19 cases or each other type of vulnerability","title":""},{"fid":"1079","uid":"39","filename":"care_web_screenshots-155-05.png","uri":"public:\/\/care_web_screenshots-155-05_0.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"362013","status":"1","timestamp":"1603830357","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2085,"width":4084},"height":"2085","width":"4084","alt":"Making comparisons between different types of vulnerability in New York State","title":""}]},"field_software_tags":[],"field_additional_people":[],"field_project_files":[],"field_project_contact":{"und":[{"email":"info@c4sr.columbia.edu"}]},"field_project_videos":[],"field_more_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_2":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_more_videos":[],"field_additional_project_text":{"und":[{"value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping the New Politics of Care is a visual journey through the inequities and vulnerabilities that define the American landscape, using different definitions to describe communities at risk, down to the county level. The project is also designed to show visitors how the areas that appear most at risk within each state shifts depending on how vulnerability is measured: from COVID-19 cases to unemployment rates, from COVID-19 deaths to formal metrics of health vulnerability such as Years of Potential Life Lost and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention\u2019s Social Vulnerability Index.\u003C\/p\u003E\r\n","format":"filtered_html","safe_value":"\u003Cp\u003EMapping the New Politics of Care is a visual journey through the inequities and vulnerabilities that define the American landscape, using different definitions to describe communities at risk, down to the county level. The project is also designed to show visitors how the areas that appear most at risk within each state shifts depending on how vulnerability is measured: from COVID-19 cases to unemployment rates, from COVID-19 deaths to formal metrics of health vulnerability such as Years of Potential Life Lost and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention\u2019s Social Vulnerability Index.\u003C\/p\u003E\n"}]},"field_project_date":{"und":[{"value":"2020-01-01 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_lead_image":{"und":[{"fid":"1084","uid":"39","filename":"csr_mapping_new_politics_care-2020-ypll_sm-02.png","uri":"public:\/\/csr_mapping_new_politics_care-2020-ypll_sm-02.png","filemime":"image\/png","filesize":"1199112","status":"1","timestamp":"1603833101","type":"image","field_image_caption":[],"field_file_image_alt_text":[],"field_file_image_title_text":[],"metadata":{"height":2501,"width":3751},"height":"2501","width":"3751","alt":"","title":""}]},"field_intro_text":[],"field_publication_links":[],"field_black_dots_in_slideshow_na":{"und":[{"value":"0"}]},"field_initiative":{"und":[{"tid":"78"}]},"field_themes":{"und":[{"tid":"89"}]},"field_methods":{"und":[{"tid":"103"},{"tid":"101"}]},"field_one_sentence_description":{"und":[{"value":"An interactive map in support of a Community Health Corps to address long-standing inequalities and COVID-19","format":null,"safe_value":"An interactive map in support of a Community Health Corps to address long-standing inequalities and COVID-19"}]},"field_project_team_v2":{"und":[{"value":"195","revision_id":"195"},{"value":"196","revision_id":"196"},{"value":"197","revision_id":"197"},{"value":"198","revision_id":"198"},{"value":"199","revision_id":"199"},{"value":"200","revision_id":"200"},{"value":"201","revision_id":"201"},{"value":"202","revision_id":"202"}]},"field_inline_images":[],"field_make_slideshow_":{"und":[{"value":"1"}]},"field_related_projects":[],"field_related_publications":[],"field_project_website_link":{"und":[{"url":"http:\/\/newpoliticsofcare.net","title":null,"attributes":[]}]},"field_dashboard_sort_date":{"und":[{"value":"2020-10-26 00:00:00","timezone":"America\/New_York","timezone_db":"America\/New_York","date_type":"datetime"}]},"field_project_gifs":[],"path":"projects\/mapping-new-politics-care","name":"dare","picture":"0","data":"a:5:{s:16:\u0022ckeditor_default\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:20:\u0022ckeditor_show_toggle\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;s:14:\u0022ckeditor_width\u0022;s:4:\u0022100%\u0022;s:13:\u0022ckeditor_lang\u0022;s:2:\u0022en\u0022;s:18:\u0022ckeditor_auto_lang\u0022;s:1:\u0022t\u0022;}","initiative":"Conflict Urbanism","sort_date":"2020","pub_link":"","pub_pdf":"","email":"","image_large":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/c4sr_large_inline_slideshow_980x500\/public\/csr_mapping_new_politics_care-2020-ypll_sm-02.png?itok=Z4Pki4u3","image_small":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/homepage-400x300\/public\/csr_mapping_new_politics_care-2020-ypll_sm-02.png?itok=VofkWtID","image_square":"https:\/\/c4sr.columbia.edu\/sites\/default\/files\/styles\/square-crop-for-button\/public\/csr_mapping_new_politics_care-2020-ypll_sm-02.png?itok=ZD1Qd17Z"},"node_path_alias":"projects\/mapping-new-politics-care"}]
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Fall 2020 Courses
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Spring 2021 Courses
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